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word usage - meaning of "be knocked off"


in this context "knocked off" means to cause deviation from the intended course. for example, the rocket was knocked off its intended trajectory causing it to miss the moon. so, in the example, by suffering this wound, the "we" are not following their intended life plans.the "off" refers to the "trajectory" similar to being "off course" as in not following the intended route.this is not to be confused with being "knocked off" (i.e. murdered) as the film noir gangsters would do if they thought you would "rat them out to the coppers".






neologisms - when is the earliest usage of 'woke' and 'wokeness' in their meanin


in her new book, a world without "whom" — the essential guide to language in the buzzfeed age (bloomsbury usa, 2017), emmy j. favilla writes this about the term woke (pp. 204-206):...one byproduct of communication in the digital era is that phrases once circulated primarily within a particular community or group often find themselves gliding rapidly into mainstream usage, shape-shifting in the process. in this age of the omnipresent hashtag, spotting an unfamiliar word traipsing around the internet and misappropriating it by assigning it the characteristics you think it reflects—or applying it in a manner that is most familiar to you—is one way this happens... sometimes, a major media event thrusts a word into the mainstream and that word shortly thereafter takes on a more nuanced ...






grammatical case - accusative vs dative: "schau in der/die schublade!"


the confusion here comes from omitting a small word:schau in der schublade nach.hence, in this example, the verb is nachschauen, in the other example it is schauen.these differ a bit in meaning and grammatical usage:wohin soll ich schauen? schau in die schublade. (akkusativ)wo soll ich nachschauen? schau in der schublade nach. (dativ)roughly translated to emphasize the different meanings:schau in die schublade. look into ...schau in der schublade nach. investigate ...to make the point more clear: the usage of schauen here is more in the sense of hineinschauen (schau in die schublade hinein), the usage of nachschauen is more in the sense of finding out if the socks are in there.omitting the word nach is commonly used in spoken language but grammatically not correct. if not omitted, both exa






meaning - what does “covfefe” exactly mean?


this is an unprecedented situation where a head of state's typo became a widely mocked online meme. essentially, trump coined a new word and then openly challenged the public to guess what it meant in a follow-up tweet.a word like this, that becomes famous in a single day, could disappear and remain meaningless, or it could take on a new meaning through viral uses and memes. as has been established in the other answers, it was almost certainly intended to be the word "coverage," but its ultimate meaning could be completely different depending on whether it sticks around or fades away, and on how slang trend-makers move the meaning. (this is a process that we're participating in right now, along with a lot of the internet.) one possibility is that people could use the word as a tongue-i...






what is the phrase or idiom for older people who still can function properly


hale is an old word meaning healthy, now largely fossilised in the phrase hale and hearty.collins defines hale as “healthy and robust”, and gives the following usage note:if you describe people, especially people who are old, as hale, you mean that they are healthy.she is remarkable and i’d like to see her remain hale and hearty for years yet.i think this has the meaning you’re looking for, and also tends to be associated with age, so it has the right connotations.the single word hale is usable on its own, but the phrase hale and hearty is probably more common. either should work for your purposes.






word usage - "regrettably" vs "regretfully"


both words have the same root: regret, meaning to feel sadness, repentance, or disappointment, but they each have their own way of dealing with it. regrettably describes something that deserves regret, and is used like the word "unfortunately." regrettably is like bad luck, and it often kicks off a sentence:for reference:https://www.vocabulary.com/articles/chooseyourwords/regrettably-regretfully/






meaning - what does “covfefe” exactly mean?


this is an unprecedented situation where a head of state's typo became a widely mocked online meme. essentially, trump coined a new word and then openly challenged the public to guess what it meant in a follow-up tweet.a word like this, that becomes famous in a single day, could disappear and remain meaningless, or it could take on a new meaning through viral uses and memes. as has been established in the other answers, it was almost certainly intended to be the word "coverage," but its ultimate meaning could be completely different depending on whether it sticks around or fades away, and on how slang trend-makers move the meaning. (this is a process that we're participating in right now, along with a lot of the internet.) one possibility is that at some point in the future, people cou...






will the word 'schadenfreude' be understood in an english text?


yes, it is used in english and its usage has increased considerably in recent decades (see ngran below) :the german loanword schadenfreude is a recent addition to the english language, but its meaning is so simple and its concept so universal that it’s probably going to stay. plus, there is no corresponding english word. simply defined, schadenfreude is pleasure derived from others’ misfortune. it is most often used in reference to the misfortunes of someone who is privileged or has been exceptionally fortunate in the past, but it doesn’t have to be used this way.like most newly arrived loanwords, schadenfreude is often italicized, and many writers still feel the need to define it or introduce it by remarking how funny it is that germans actually have a word for this—for example:on...






will the word 'schadenfreude' be understood in an english text?


yes, it is used in english and its usage has increased considerably in recent decades (see ngram):the german loanword schadenfreude is a recent addition to the english language, but its meaning is so simple and its concept so universal that it’s probably going to stay. plus, there is no corresponding english word. simply defined, schadenfreude is pleasure derived from others’ misfortune. it is most often used in reference to the misfortunes of someone who is privileged or has been exceptionally fortunate in the past, but it doesn’t have to be used this way.like most newly arrived loanwords, schadenfreude is often italicized, and many writers still feel the need to define it or introduce it by remarking how funny it is that germans actually have a word for this—for example:only if y...






phrases - is there a non-vulgar version of "... pulled it out of their ass?"


for a usage that implies that something (an object or idea, etc.) appeared from nowhere, you could say, "he pulled it out of thin air."on the other hand, if what you want is a usage meaning that they are "bullshitting" (as in making something up), then you could say, "he fabricated it out of whole cloth."






why オタク word is in katakana?


yes, オタク comes from a japanese word. from english wikipedia:otaku is derived from a japanese term for another person's house or family (お宅, otaku). this word is often used metaphorically, as an honorific second-person pronoun. in this usage, its literal translation is "you".(...)the modern slang form, which is distinguished from the older usage by being written only in hiragana (おたく), katakana (オタク or, less frequently, ヲタク) or rarely in rōmaji, first appeared in public discourse in the 1980s, through the work of humorist and essayist akio nakamori. in addition to the transliteration of foreign words or writing words that would use rare kanji, katakana is often used to make the reader pay attention to some word that would normally be written in another way, c...






why is the word オタク written in katakana?


yes, オタク comes from a japanese word. from english wikipedia:otaku is derived from a japanese term for another person's house or family (お宅, otaku). this word is often used metaphorically, as an honorific second-person pronoun. in this usage, its literal translation is "you".(...)the modern slang form, which is distinguished from the older usage by being written only in hiragana (おたく), katakana (オタク or, less frequently, ヲタク) or rarely in rōmaji, first appeared in public discourse in the 1980s, through the work of humorist and essayist akio nakamori. in addition to the transliteration of foreign words or writing words that would use rare kanji, katakana is often used to make the reader pay attention to some word that would normally be written in another way, c...






etymology - can we call it a dry spell?


a spell is the opposite of a fixed period of time— (mw)3a. an indeterminate period of time; also a continuous period of timeb. a stretch of a specified type of weatherif my elderly neighbor asks me to come sit for a spell, i don't know whether she intends to keep me for two minutes or two hours.as you know from the oed, this meaning derives from an old verb sense of spell meaning to take the place of (a person) at some work or labour; to relieve (another) by taking a turn at workwhich is said to persist in australian and u.s. usage. this, in turn, is traced to spele, a rare or dialectical word meaning to take or stand in the place of (another); to represent.this in turn is from old english of obscure origin, but believed to be related to gespelia and spala; a spale was a sparing, respit...






separable verbs - what does the word "ab" mean?


you flagged your question with the tag "separable verbs".how could i translate ... the meaning of the word "ab"normally for separable verbs it makes no sense at all to look at the two parts of the verb separately:the verb "abhauen" for example has two different meanings and one of them has nothing to do with the meaning of the verb "hauen".the example "abhauen" shows that the two parts of a separable verb in many cases do have no meaning on their own.this is also true for the "ab" in "abtragen" as well.indeed separable verbs are formed of two words ("ab" and "tragen") however a german teacher would tell you that the following sentence:er trägt die erde ab.... neither contains the word "tragen" ("trägt") nor the word "ab" but that it contains the word "abtragen" ...






word usage - "fixing" an error


you are correct, there can be ambiguity in the meanings.fixis usually used to mean correct, whereasfixedis used to mean immobilize.in usage, usually additional context is usually supplied to avoid confusion, also an understanding of possible scenarios is necessary to properly understand some sentences, the entire sentence has to be read before the meaning is understood. for example,fix that chair downanchor the chair so it doesn't movethis will fix all our problems.this will solve all our problemsi fixed the bug in the programi corrected the bug in the programthe chair is fixed to the groundthe chair is set into the ground so it doesn't movewe fixed the problem by fixing the chair to a tree.we solved the problem by tying the chair to a tree






correlation - nitpicking about the active/passive usage of "correlated"


"correlate" is a back formation of "correlation", which comes from "co" (with) and "relation". which i suppose is a bit redundant, as a relation is always with something else. it would be acceptable to say "we related x to y", so i think that from a "lay" perspective, it makes sense to say "we correlated x to y". one could argue that in a math context, "correlate" has a specific meaning that precludes this use, but that raises questions such as "what is that meaning?" "how was it established?", and "in what circumstances is it reasonable to call for math specific usage?". for instance, there was a jeopardy! clue along the lines of "it's the set of points within a fixed distance of a central point." the "correct" response was "what is sphere", but mathematically...






is there a word/ phrase to describe somebody who has devoted their life to pract


you might consider this noun phrase, or something like it:perpetual novicethis phrase is sometimes used in the field of software development (and possibly elsewhere) to refer to someone who has acquired plenty of experience without acquiring the high level of skill that is expected to come with the experience. an example of this usage is in the title of the blog post "perpetual novice – years of experience vs skill".novice (or a word with similar meaning such as beginner,neophyte, or apprentice) implies someone who is trying to learn something in which they are not yet expert. like most of its synonyms, novice also implies that someone is new to this field of endeavor, so the word perpetual makes the phrase an oxymoron. the perpetual novice may put in ...






meaning - etymology of "caleb quotem"


well, if you're really looking for the etymology, i can tell you that caleb is thought to derive from the hebrew word; kelev, meaning "dog" or a compound name from kal "whole" or "all of" (according to one source) and lev meaning "heart". so caleb either means "dog", "wholehearted" or "as if with intelligence/heart/understanding"according to the website, behind the name, the name is more popular in the us and in scotland. in 2009, caleb was the 31st most popular name for a boy in the usa. however, caleb has since steadily fallen in popularity and in 2016, it ranked just 44th. quotem, as a surname, seems to be a nonce word. its nearest equivalent in latin would be quotus, in english quotum, meaning a part or proportion.






terminology - who was or what is týn in prague?


i'll add to david richerby's answer. translating from czech wikipedia, týn (also týnský dvůr, meaning "týn yard") was a fenced in and moated trader's yard where traders had to pay a toll ("ungelt" in old german, which is also the alternative name) for protection. i do not know about the meaning of the word týn, but the fence explanation given by david richerby sounds plausible. to me, as a native speaker, the word týn doesn't really carry any meaning.finally, "před týnem" means "in front of týn".






terminology - who was or what is týn in prague?


i'll add to david richerby's answer. translating from the czech wiki, týn (also týnský dvůr, meaning "týn yard") was a fenced in and moated trader's yard where traders had to pay a toll ("ungelt" in old german, which is also the alternative name) for protection. i do not know about the meaning of the word týn, but the fence explanation given by david richerby sounds plausible. to me, as a native speak, the word týn doesn't really carry any meaning.finally, "před týnem" means "in front of týn".






pejorative language - is there a word for the joy a smart aleck feels when they


i'd use superiority or self-satisfactionsuperiority's definition looks benign, but it's usual usage indicates something along the lines you're after. see the example of contemporary usage:he is a narcissistic rogue who is utterly convinced of his own brilliance and superiority to those around him.self-satisfaction's definition looks closer to what you've asked; however, dictionay.com's contemporary usage examples ironically are more benign. a good example of its use is:they are so self-opiniated [sic], and so full of self-satisfaction, that it is hard to be patient with them.in the context, you could also use self-congratulation






spoken english - when is "me" used as a possessive pronoun, instead of "my"?


the exampled usage of me in your sentences occurs in some regional english (the country) areas whereme = myand can be interchangeable. for example, in cockney (east london) rhyming slangcheers me old china.thanks matethe rhyming is due to "china plate" and "mate" (meaning friend) making the rhyme.the usage has continued over many years where regional dialect forms part of one's identity.another expression isthat would be some of me.i want some of that.which can be said when looking at something desirable.the usage is very old, in the winter's tale shakespeare uses"me thoughts, i did recoil"and in richard iii"methought that glouster stumbled"






shashi tharoor explains the meaning of 'ache din' on twitter, gets hindi lessons


the term 'ache din' was coined in 2014 by the then prime ministerial candidate of the bharatiya janta party, narendra modi during the general electionssenior congress leader shashi tharoor recently took to twitter to explain what the word ‘ache din’ means. the highly used term was coined in 2014 by the then prime ministerial candidate of the bharatiya janta party, narendra modi during the general elections. the bjp had also used it as a slogan in the general elections.as per shashi tharoor, the meaning of word ‘ache’ is continuous or prolonged dull pain in a part of one’s body. he even explained the usage the word by making a sentence that read, “the ache in her head worsened”. according to shashi tharoor, the synonyms of ache are a dull pain, pain, pang, twinge, throb.mean...






word choice - "to fart" in child language


in ame, if you want another word to refer to a child farting, then you could use toot or poot. i could not quickly find a reputable dictionary entry for this particular usage of toot, but it is simply an extension of its dictionary meaning (oald): toota short, sharp sound made by a horn, trumpet, or similar instrument.there is an entry for poot in the oaldusinformalbreak wind.‘somebody just pooted’there are two from wiktionary: toot, pootfor context, there are many euphemisms for fart. "breaking wind" as used above is one. another is passing gas (tfd):pass gaseuph. to release intestinal gas through the anus. someone on the bus had passed gas. it smelled awful. something i ate at lunch made me pass gas all afternoon.this can apply to any person.finally, the formal word is flatulence (...






what is youthquake, oxford dictionaries' word of the year for 2017?


young voters rallied behind labour leader jeremy corbyn this summer, and many publications called the impact of their turnout a “youthquake.” (anthony devlin/getty images)london — the oxford dictionaries word of the year 2017 has been revealed, and the winner is ... “youthquake.”confused? you may not be the only one.the word is defined as meaning “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.” it represents the awakening of millennials striving for change during a turbulent 12 months across the world.data collected by editors at oxford dictionaries revealed a huge increase in usage of the word in 2017 compared with 2016. the british election called by prime minister theresa may in early june is believed to have...






what is 'youthquake,' oxford dictionaries' word of the year for 2017?


young voters rallied behind labour leader jeremy corbyn this summer, and many publications called the impact of their turnout a “youthquake.” (anthony devlin/getty images)london — the oxford dictionaries word of the year 2017 has been revealed, and the winner is ... “youthquake.”confused? you may not be the only one.the word is defined as meaning “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.” it represents the awakening of millennials striving for change during a turbulent 12 months across the world.data collected by editors at oxford dictionaries revealed a huge increase in usage of the word in 2017 compared with 2016. the british election called by prime minister theresa may in early june is believed to have...






what english is this? - english language learners stack exchange


the exampled usage of me in your sentences occurs in some regional english (the country) areas whereme = myand can be interchangeable. for example, in cockney (east london) rhyming slangcheers me old china.thanks matethe rhyming is due to "china plate" and "mate" (meaning friend) making the rhyme.the usage has continued over many years where regional dialect forms part of one's identity.another expression isthat would be some of me.i want some of that.which can be said when looking at something desirable.the usage is very old, in the winter's tale shakespeare uses"me thoughts, i did recoil"and in richard iii"methought that glouster stumbled"






word meaning - agnostic vs atheist


disclaimer: i write this answer as a self-ascribed atheist who does not see much value in the term agnosticism.your confusion stems from overloading of the terms and different usage in theological / philosophical discourse and everyday speech. in everyday speech it is also important to distinguish who uses the term for what reasons.let's start by the literal meaning of "atheist". an atheist, from greek "a" (not, without) and "theist" (from theos: god), literally: "without-god" is someone who is not a theist.a theist claims the existence of a least one divine being. an atheist does not do that. an atheist does not claim the existence of a divine being.an atheist does not need to deny the existence of a divine being. it's a term to merely state: i am not one of a group of people sh...






word usage - what is the difference between "thanks" and "thank you"?


to add to tromano's great answer, "thanks" isn't as much stranger-friendly as "thank you". "thanks" is mostly used with family and friends.when you say “thanks” to someone, it’s like a quick verbal pat on the back. the word itself doesn’t take much effort to say and it just rolls off your tongue. if you drop a pencil and someone picks it up for you, you’d say “thanks.” you basically would say thanks to just about anybody.“thank you” on the other hand is a verbal hug. it takes more effort to say and people often add some tonal emphasis on either the first or second word. plus it’s more personal since it actually includes the word “you.” rarely do people say “thank you”, and not mean it. it’s often a genuine expression of appreciation and possibly affect...






americans still don’t understand what ‘risk’ means, and they are proving it agai


(tom toles)the english language has some weak spots. the word “flammable” means capable of being set on fire. the word “inflammable” also means capable of being set on fire.another word whose meaning has been eroded into meaning something like its opposite is “risk.” at one time it meant a proximity to danger, that is, a proximity to something terrible happening. the erosion of this meaning started in the financial sector. the old formula laid out a spectrum with safety and lower yields at one end and higher risk with potentially higher yield at the other.then the wizards of high finance began to work their alchemy. as they moved themselves and the rest of the economy up the slippery hill to higher yields, the word “risk” not only started losing its implication of danger bu...






word usage - particular moment of understanding


the formal word i can think of is epiphany:epiphany3 a (1) : a usually sudden manifestation or perception of the essential nature or meaning of something (2) : an intuitive grasp of reality through something (such as an event) usually simple and striking (3) : an illuminating discovery, realization, or disclosureb : a revealing scene or momentdefinition of epiphany for english language learners: a moment in which you suddenly see or understand something in a new or very clear way(m-w)it depends on the context, but usually the verb click is used, as opposed to click moment. for example, "and then it clicked! i realized why x worked." it's informal.click verb (become clear)[i] infml to be understood or become clear suddenly:something clicked, and i remembered where i’d seen her before.(...






fashion: how will it reflect on us?


what is the meaning of fashion?the word fashion (derived from the latin 'facere', meaning to do or make) has today come to mean something that is transient, something that will naturally become less desirable over time.if 'x is the fashion', it could mean anything from building styles, cars and travel to food, clothing and even dog breeds.yet somehow the word fashion has become most strongly associated, or even interchangeable, with the word 'clothing' (and i'm just as guilty as the next person for using it).a garment of course requires less cash and commitment than the purchase of a building, car or holiday. but as prominent trend forecaster li edelkoort recently said 'now that many garments are offered cheaper than a sandwich we all know and feel that something is profoundly and ...






word request - the opposite of "wanted"


when a person is wanted everybody wants to work with him, he's popular and is always asked for. but is there an opposite for wanted, meaning a person who isn't popular at work, someone whom nobody wants to work with.i was thinking of the word outcast but i doubt it can refer to such a meaning considering its definition.i would like to fit it into this context:my friend is always wanted while i am always [this word].






word usage - can the unexpected validity of the literal meaning of a phrase on t


oxford defines a pun quite tightly asa joke exploiting the different possible meanings of a word or the fact that there are words which sound alike but have different meanings. ‘the railway society reception was an informal party of people of all stations (excuse the pun) in life’the mishearing of genes as jeans fits the definition of a pun: it relies on the similar sound. an example of different meanings is given in the quote above, where “station”=“status in life” is paired with “railway station”. another might be “his breath came in short pants,” which might conjure a really confused image.above the law is literalising a metaphor. normally, it means that one is metaphorically above the law and not subject to it; in the use in the question, it is made literal: the clo...






single-word antonym for "cheapest"? - english language & usage stack exchange


i've been doing a translation for an article and it occured to me that i don't know a one-word antonym for the word 'cheapest'. i tried googling it, and the best suggestion i got was 'expensive', but that's not right since 'the most expensive' is the proper antonym. and it's not a one-word antonym! i understand that it's how the degrees of comparison work with different words, but is there really no direct one-word antonym?the context is: after an aesthetic surgery, lette becomes a success model that is unanimously accepted by the consumerist society in which everything is for sale, and the prettiest package sells _______ (antonym of 'cheapest') it's from a commentary describing a play by marius von mayenburg (in case anyone is interested).